Corbyn, Sargon and Glastonbury

David Yorkshire

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Jeremy Corbyn typifies the contemporary Left. He is, if you like, the SJW’s grandad. Born into an affluent middle-class family, he pretends to be the voice of the working class, like so many of his Leftist contemporaries: Ken Loach, whose premiere of I, Daniel Blake Corbyn attended, is a prime example. Of course, when these people put their fists in the air and shout about the working class, they invariably deconstruct the White working class of Great Britain, and Loach’s aforementioned film, which Corbyn lauded, is a prime example, although that is for another article. The White working classes are ‘soooo yesterday’ and these people have moved on to the minority groups displacing and abusing Britain’s indigenous working class. Unfortunately, those same native workers – and voters – seem largely not to have noticed.

Corbyn is an interesting case study: over the past few months, he seems to have been developing himself into a British Bernie Sanders. Far from being deluded in his rhetoric that often suggests he actually won the General Election, he is pushing an idea – the idea that the democratic vote only matters when the extreme Left wins. It is an idea that has been pushed by SJWs on university campuses all over the Western World. And make no mistake, his election campaign, which saw the Labour Party resurgent, was aimed at young SJWs and their pet ethnic minorities. Unlike former party leaders, Corbyn has been quick to get up to speed with Leftist youth culture, which is why Labour was quick on the draw in the battle of memes and why he has now taken to the stage to speak at Glastonbury.
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EYE OF THE MAELSTRÖM: A Tribute to Wyndham Lewis

David Yorkshire

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Mr Wyndham Lewis as a Tyro, self-portrait, 1921

The artist and writer Wyndham Lewis, born Percy Wyndham Lewis, styled The Enemy, was born on 18th November 1882 and is still very much alive, even if a cross-section of his brain has been dunked in a perspex case of formalin and stored in the Pathology Museum now in Hammersmith. A naturally rather antagonistic chap, he hit the London art scene like a dishevelled brick upon his arrival from Canada in 1908, and, while his effect on mainstream culture was extremely limited in his own time, his influence on the modernist movement from the 1910s onward has transformed contemporary art both in terms of succession and reaction to his life, politics, and work.

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Welcome to the Global Village

David Yorkshire

Originally published at the Mjolnir Magazine Blog

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This year marks the fiftieth anniversary of the production of one of the very few television series that achieved the status of high art. I speak here of The Prisoner, largely the vision of one man: Patrick McGoohan – although his Jewish script editor George Markstein tried to take as much credit as possible for its conception. Marginalised and ignored, Markstein left before the end of the series. The series did, however, owe more to co-producer as well as director and writer of several episodes David Tomblin. There has since been a re-imagined version of the series, in 2009, which was largely thinly-veiled propaganda for the homosexual lobby, but this is not the concern of this particular article.

Firstly, a note about the quality: some of the episodes are cobbled together and superfluous to the overall narrative. This is because McGoohan had conceived of a serial of seven episodes, but ATV head (((Lew Grade))) wanted twenty-six for commercial purposes. They settled on seventeen. Particularly the episodes Do Not Forsake Me Oh My Darling, Living in Harmony and The Girl Who Was Death can be ignored.

McGoohan stated in an interview that The Prisoner came out of an “impatience with the new morology of society and the way we were being made into cyphers and so on.” The series, then, is an explicit reaction against the 1960s counterculture that has taken hold of the contemporary mainstream. It is thus more relevant now than when it was first aired in 1967.

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Oktoberfest: Cultural Diversity and Cultural Death

David Yorkshire
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As all true nationalists know, and indeed anyone left with any common sense, different races create different cultures because the races of men are intrinsically different. This means that wherever one goes in Europe, one finds cultures that, while having regional differences caused by historical distance between groups and national differences caused by political boundaries, are nonetheless similar in character. In contrast, if one travels further to the Middle East or Africa, the cultures there are utterly alien.

This is why Oktoberfest has attracted people from all over the world and yet its clientele has remained 99% White European despite attempts at “diversification” (see above). In Islamic societies, of course, the consumption of alcohol is either frowned upon or forbidden. This contrasts quite starkly with the White European tradition where alcohol has always been consumed, sometimes for the better and sometimes for the worse. Sensible drinking enhances a pleasurable evening, but one ought never to make an important decision after a few pints: “When the beer is in, the wits are out,” as we say in Yorkshire.

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Charles​ Krafft Exhibition​

David Yorkshire, editor of Mjolnir Magazine

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The artist Charles Krafft should need no introduction to people on the Alt Right. His infamy in the art world is such since his “outing” by The New Yorker, The Guardian and other leftist publications. His exhibits in museums and art galleries now come with public health warnings. He is currently exhibiting in Texas and we wish him well and ask that others support him and invest in his work. Here he explains in his own words:

“CONJUGAL VISIT” is the name of a body of work with a prison theme that I prepared last year (2015) for an exhibition in the East End of London. My idea was to commemorate some of the more notorious American and British penitentiaries and their famous inmates on china. Due to juvenile social media shaming at the Not Banksy forum and a spate of obscene phone calls made to the gallery the show was cancelled before it opened and the work never got seen there. Texas is the crown jewel in America’s burgeoning prison industrial complex so I can think of no better place than Houston to premiere this work plus a selection newer and seldom seen pieces from my ongoing Porcelain War Museum and Disasterware™ series. Let’s hope the Iron Curtain of social justice sanctimony in the visual arts doesn’t drop again.

Luckily, his trip to London was not entirely wasted and I had the pleasure of welcoming him to the London Forum. Here is his speech: