Rotten Daffodils

By Thomas Jones

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There is a tendency among the Welsh to show great pride in the deeds of past ancestors who fought against English conquest; of men who wanted to force the English back, the championing of a distinct Welsh identity, the preservation of the nation’s culture, it’s heritage and it’s language. However, as with so many of the Scots and Irish, such fervour doesn’t appear to extend to the current and even greater invasion coming from third worlds. In fact, it would seem that the political leaders of modern Wales are, in a complete volte-face from those of popular heroes like Owain Glyndwr, actually making it easier for foreigners to undermine and displace the Welsh people in their own homeland.

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Arrogant, Brazen Turks

By Thomas Jones

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Throughout its history, Turkey has been the scene of many an invasion and migration of peoples moving west-east and vice versa. The Ottomans absorbed many cultural aspects of the various regions they conquered, often added new dimensions to them. As such, the Turks are predominantly a mix of West Mediterranean, West Asian (Semitic) and even Central Asian ethnic backgrounds; all since unified by a common tongue and faith.

The historian Andrew Mango, noted for his biographical work on the Turkish Republic’s founder, Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, describes the Turkish nation as such:

“The Turkish nation took shape in the centuries of Seljuk and Ottoman power. The nomadic Turkish conquerors did not displace the original local inhabitants: Hellenized Anatolians (or simply Greeks), Armenians, people of Caucasian origins, Kurds, Assyrians and—in the Balkans—Slavs, Albanians and others. They intermarried with them, while many local people converted to Islam and ‘turned Turk’. They were joined by Muslims from the lands north of the Black Sea and the Caucasus, by Persian craftsmen and Arab scholars, and by European adventurers and converts, known in the West as renegades. As a result, the Turks today exhibit a wide variety of ethnic types. Some have delicate Far Eastern, others heavy local Anatolian features, some, who are descended from Slavs, Albanians or Circassians, have light complexions, others are dark-skinned, many look Mediterranean, others Central Asian, many appear Persian. A numerically small, but commercially and intellectually important, group is descended from converts from Judaism. One can hear Turks describe some of their fellow countrymen as ‘hatchet-nosed Lazes’ (a people on the Black Sea coast), ‘dark Arabs’ (a term which includes descendants of black slaves), or even ‘fellahs’. But they are all Turks.”

Prior to Ottoman defeat in WWI, giving way to language reforms initiated by Atatürk, the Turkish language was heavily influenced by both Arabic and Persian. Turkey’s largest religion, Islam, is in many ways an expression of Arab culture. Indeed, Atatürk, a secularist, claimed it was a form of Arab nationalism. Atatürk tried to eradicate the old Arab-Persian cultural dominance and Islam in favour of a renewed Turkish language, culture, and French-style laïcité secularism. It didn’t work.

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Danes Lead the Way?

By Thomas Jones

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Dannebrog falling from the sky during the battle of Lyndanisse, Christian August Lorentzen

Sweden has become rather notorious in right-wing circles of late. Their quest to become the progressive jewel in the crown of the EU has led them to become a joke in the eyes of many, with the ‘Captain Sweden and ‘Sweden Yes’ memes being good examples. It is a shame that a country which could produce men like Gustav II Adolf could become a nation ruled by people who become upset when they realise they can only play host so many Somali and Arab migrants. Sweden is much like Canada or Germany in this regard. Although, in all fairness, the dynamics are quite different. Germany is in a stranglehold, supposedly indebted, endlessly apologetic, and crumbling under the weight the greatest guilt complex in Europe. Canada, meanwhile, anxious to atone for its own colonial origins, finds solace in PR campaigns designed to promote itself as niceness and humility incarnate. Indeed, Justin Trudeau, a man with maple syrup for blood, makes the job a fair bit easier. Sweden carries a much lighter load. Pure as its own driven snow, this is a nation at the bottom of the list for finger pointers, and yet it insists on outdoing everyone else in the competition of self-destructive tolerance.

In Norway, another nation subject to only a small measure historical grievances, constitutional monarch Harald V recently decided to (perhaps, under duress) declare his support for the usual policies of multiculturalism, endless mass immigration, feminism, LGBT pandering, so on and so forth.

However, not everything is so bleak in Scandinavia, as Sweden’s historical rival and Norway’s former master, Denmark, appear to have taken some positive steps forward.

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Genetic Testing and Identity

By Thomas Jones

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23andMe, a personal genomics and biotechnology company, has been much discussed since its launch in 2006. In 2008, when the company was offering estimates of “predisposition for more than 90 traits and conditions ranging from baldness to blindness”, Time magazine named the saliva-based personal genome test ‘Invention of the Year’. By 2012, the company had doubled its existing capital. In 2015, that capital hit $241 million.

When I first saw the adverts for 23andMe, it seemed that the primary purpose was to assess the customer’s predisposition to certain diseases and health problems, such as certain cancers, coronary heart disease, possible drug responses, and the possibility of various inherited conditions. This is the first advertisement that I ever saw from them. One of the last lines is “learn more about your health” as if to imply that medical testing is the primary function of their product and services. However, the company’s marketing has since changed with a greater focus being on ancestry and ethnicity. The latest version of the website now features two major services; one is for ‘health and ancestry’, while the other simply concerns ‘ancestry’.

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Whither Canada

By Thomas Jones

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“There’s no avoiding the looming presence of U.S. culture on Canada, but our differences are substantive, concrete and homegrown. Our universal health care. Our social welfare system and collective sensibilities concerning the role of government, taxation and property rights. Our official bilingualism and take on multiculturalism. Our accommodations of Quebec’s cultural aspirations and of aboriginal rights and governance. Our rejection of gun culture — no constitutional right to bear arms here — and our liberal take on issues like abortion, capital punishment, drug enforcement and gay rights.”

-Pete McMartin

 

“But English Canada, at least, never really found its footing as one of those nations [with a strong sense of identity]. (French Canada did, an essential point of difference.) Lucky for us, it is now too late, and we have no choice but to establish ourselves as something different – a culture that is many cultures, many stories, in a place that stretches across a continent and is richly occupied… ere we are in 2016, when few dispute any longer the unseemly length of English Canada’s colonial hangover. For the first century of nationhood, we didn’t bother moving away from imported and inherited customs and thinking, a stark disavowal of lived history and geography. Canada in the 21st century is certainly an energized place by comparison… we must get past one easy misconception – the outdated nation-state model – and one harder reality: the historic comfort level among Canadians with conceiving of themselves as parts of smaller, cozier self-definitions, as well an attendant incuriosity about who else lives reasonably nearby. The launching point for this project is obvious. Indigenous Canada is where we all live, in terms of geography, spirit, and history. In order for that to be real and meaningful, we must start with the stark: that a cultural genocide occurred, and most of us were unaware or, perhaps, just not concerned enough. Artistic expressions of these truths are necessary, and can only help. Overall, Canada as an experimental cultural space requires the right spirit in order to take shape. That spirit, simply, is an openness to having your history unsettled and your mind changed. As well, a certain comfort level with complexity and irresolution is probably good.”

-Charles Foran

 

“There is no core identity, no mainstream Canada… There are shared values – openness, respect, compassion, willingness to work hard, to be there for each other, to search for equality and justice. Those qualities are what make us the first postnational state.”

-Justin Trudeau

The above are quotes from a journalist, the CEO of a pro-immigrant cabal, and the current prime minister of Canada. My country is being destroyed from within and I know this is true of a great many White countries, but to an outsider, at least, it appears as if most of them have a greater chance of resistance than Canada. This seems especially true in Europe, where the inhabitants can look back to thousands of years of historical inheritance.

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