The Logic of Modern Art

Integral Axis

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The essence of modern art is the negation of beauty. The value of beauty – along with its association with the sacred – is inverted. Ugliness and vulgarity are now put forward as ‘art.’

The method for how this is done:

Beauty has two forms: 1) beauty-without-form (generalised beauty), 2) and beauty-with-form (the beauty of particular things.) There is, additionally, the perennial connection between the aesthetic and the sacred.

This gives three means of inverting beauty:

  1. Inversion of beauty-without-form
  2. Inversion of beauty-with-form
  3. Inversion of aesthetic/sacred link

We will begin by looking at 1) beauty-without-form.

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Modern Architecture and Ugliness

Edwin Harwood

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The Barbican Centre, London

It has been voted the ugliest building in London, a city which has had
more criminally distasteful erections than Jimmy Saville. I attended a
debate at the Barbican centre for the battle of ideas conference on
the subject of conflict between architectural modernisation and
preservation. As I approached the sprawling, barbaric, Brutalist
beast, whose concrete entrails spill forth in every direction, I was
deeply disgusted in a palpably physical sense. The only redeeming
features, the conservatory and ponds, are those which rely on the
inherent and eternal beauty of nature. The building itself wilfully
ignores the history of the land it was built upon; its construction,
therefore, was an act of hatred.

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EYE OF THE MAELSTRÖM: A Tribute to Wyndham Lewis

David Yorkshire

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Mr Wyndham Lewis as a Tyro, self-portrait, 1921

The artist and writer Wyndham Lewis, born Percy Wyndham Lewis, styled The Enemy, was born on 18th November 1882 and is still very much alive, even if a cross-section of his brain has been dunked in a perspex case of formalin and stored in the Pathology Museum now in Hammersmith. A naturally rather antagonistic chap, he hit the London art scene like a dishevelled brick upon his arrival from Canada in 1908, and, while his effect on mainstream culture was extremely limited in his own time, his influence on the modernist movement from the 1910s onward has transformed contemporary art both in terms of succession and reaction to his life, politics, and work.

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Charles​ Krafft Exhibition​

David Yorkshire, editor of Mjolnir Magazine

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The artist Charles Krafft should need no introduction to people on the Alt Right. His infamy in the art world is such since his “outing” by The New Yorker, The Guardian and other leftist publications. His exhibits in museums and art galleries now come with public health warnings. He is currently exhibiting in Texas and we wish him well and ask that others support him and invest in his work. Here he explains in his own words:

“CONJUGAL VISIT” is the name of a body of work with a prison theme that I prepared last year (2015) for an exhibition in the East End of London. My idea was to commemorate some of the more notorious American and British penitentiaries and their famous inmates on china. Due to juvenile social media shaming at the Not Banksy forum and a spate of obscene phone calls made to the gallery the show was cancelled before it opened and the work never got seen there. Texas is the crown jewel in America’s burgeoning prison industrial complex so I can think of no better place than Houston to premiere this work plus a selection newer and seldom seen pieces from my ongoing Porcelain War Museum and Disasterware™ series. Let’s hope the Iron Curtain of social justice sanctimony in the visual arts doesn’t drop again.

Luckily, his trip to London was not entirely wasted and I had the pleasure of welcoming him to the London Forum. Here is his speech: