Danes Lead the Way?

Thomas Jones

danmarks_flag_1219_lorentzen
Dannebrog falling from the sky during the battle of Lyndanisse, Christian August Lorentzen

Sweden has become rather notorious in right-wing circles of late. Their quest to become the progressive jewel in the crown of the EU has led them to become a joke in the eyes of many, with the ‘Captain Sweden and ‘Sweden Yes’ memes being good examples. It is a shame that a country which could produce men like Gustav II Adolf could become a nation ruled by people who become upset when they realise they can only play host so many Somali and Arab migrants. Sweden is much like Canada or Germany in this regard. Although, in all fairness, the dynamics are quite different. Germany is in a stranglehold, supposedly indebted, endlessly apologetic, and crumbling under the weight the greatest guilt complex in Europe. Canada, meanwhile, anxious to atone for its own colonial origins, finds solace in PR campaigns designed to promote itself as niceness and humility incarnate. Indeed, Justin Trudeau, a man with maple syrup for blood, makes the job a fair bit easier. Sweden carries a much lighter load. Pure as its own driven snow, this is a nation at the bottom of the list for finger pointers, and yet it insists on outdoing everyone else in the competition of self-destructive tolerance.

In Norway, another nation subject to only a small measure historical grievances, constitutional monarch Harald V recently decided to (perhaps, under duress) declare his support for the usual policies of multiculturalism, endless mass immigration, feminism, LGBT pandering, so on and so forth.

However, not everything is so bleak in Scandinavia, as Sweden’s historical rival and Norway’s former master, Denmark, appear to have taken some positive steps forward.

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Oktoberfest: Cultural Diversity and Cultural Death

David Yorkshire
oktoberfest

As all true nationalists know, and indeed anyone left with any common sense, different races create different cultures because the races of men are intrinsically different. This means that wherever one goes in Europe, one finds cultures that, while having regional differences caused by historical distance between groups and national differences caused by political boundaries, are nonetheless similar in character. In contrast, if one travels further to the Middle East or Africa, the cultures there are utterly alien.

This is why Oktoberfest has attracted people from all over the world and yet its clientele has remained 99% White European despite attempts at “diversification” (see above). In Islamic societies, of course, the consumption of alcohol is either frowned upon or forbidden. This contrasts quite starkly with the White European tradition where alcohol has always been consumed, sometimes for the better and sometimes for the worse. Sensible drinking enhances a pleasurable evening, but one ought never to make an important decision after a few pints: “When the beer is in, the wits are out,” as we say in Yorkshire.

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Whither Canada

Thomas Jones

currentyeareh

“There’s no avoiding the looming presence of U.S. culture on Canada, but our differences are substantive, concrete and homegrown. Our universal health care. Our social welfare system and collective sensibilities concerning the role of government, taxation and property rights. Our official bilingualism and take on multiculturalism. Our accommodations of Quebec’s cultural aspirations and of aboriginal rights and governance. Our rejection of gun culture — no constitutional right to bear arms here — and our liberal take on issues like abortion, capital punishment, drug enforcement and gay rights.”

-Pete McMartin

 

“But English Canada, at least, never really found its footing as one of those nations [with a strong sense of identity]. (French Canada did, an essential point of difference.) Lucky for us, it is now too late, and we have no choice but to establish ourselves as something different – a culture that is many cultures, many stories, in a place that stretches across a continent and is richly occupied… ere we are in 2016, when few dispute any longer the unseemly length of English Canada’s colonial hangover. For the first century of nationhood, we didn’t bother moving away from imported and inherited customs and thinking, a stark disavowal of lived history and geography. Canada in the 21st century is certainly an energized place by comparison… we must get past one easy misconception – the outdated nation-state model – and one harder reality: the historic comfort level among Canadians with conceiving of themselves as parts of smaller, cozier self-definitions, as well an attendant incuriosity about who else lives reasonably nearby. The launching point for this project is obvious. Indigenous Canada is where we all live, in terms of geography, spirit, and history. In order for that to be real and meaningful, we must start with the stark: that a cultural genocide occurred, and most of us were unaware or, perhaps, just not concerned enough. Artistic expressions of these truths are necessary, and can only help. Overall, Canada as an experimental cultural space requires the right spirit in order to take shape. That spirit, simply, is an openness to having your history unsettled and your mind changed. As well, a certain comfort level with complexity and irresolution is probably good.”

-Charles Foran

 

“There is no core identity, no mainstream Canada… There are shared values – openness, respect, compassion, willingness to work hard, to be there for each other, to search for equality and justice. Those qualities are what make us the first postnational state.”

-Justin Trudeau

The above are quotes from a journalist, the CEO of a pro-immigrant cabal, and the current prime minister of Canada. My country is being destroyed from within and I know this is true of a great many White countries, but to an outsider, at least, it appears as if most of them have a greater chance of resistance than Canada. This seems especially true in Europe, where the inhabitants can look back to thousands of years of historical inheritance.

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