Corbyn, Sargon and Glastonbury

David Yorkshire

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Jeremy Corbyn typifies the contemporary Left. He is, if you like, the SJW’s grandad. Born into an affluent middle-class family, he pretends to be the voice of the working class, like so many of his Leftist contemporaries: Ken Loach, whose premiere of I, Daniel Blake Corbyn attended, is a prime example. Of course, when these people put their fists in the air and shout about the working class, they invariably deconstruct the White working class of Great Britain, and Loach’s aforementioned film, which Corbyn lauded, is a prime example, although that is for another article. The White working classes are ‘soooo yesterday’ and these people have moved on to the minority groups displacing and abusing Britain’s indigenous working class. Unfortunately, those same native workers – and voters – seem largely not to have noticed.

Corbyn is an interesting case study: over the past few months, he seems to have been developing himself into a British Bernie Sanders. Far from being deluded in his rhetoric that often suggests he actually won the General Election, he is pushing an idea – the idea that the democratic vote only matters when the extreme Left wins. It is an idea that has been pushed by SJWs on university campuses all over the Western World. And make no mistake, his election campaign, which saw the Labour Party resurgent, was aimed at young SJWs and their pet ethnic minorities. Unlike former party leaders, Corbyn has been quick to get up to speed with Leftist youth culture, which is why Labour was quick on the draw in the battle of memes and why he has now taken to the stage to speak at Glastonbury.
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#blinkers

Badb Catha

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Alas! There comes the time when man will no longer give birth to any star. Alas! There comes the time of the most despicable man, who can no longer despise himself.

Lo! I show you the Last Man.

“What is love? What is creation? What is longing? What is a star?” — so asks the Last Man, and blinks.

The earth has become small, and on it hops the Last Man, who makes everything small. His species is ineradicable as the flea; the Last Man lives longest.

“We have discovered happiness” — say the Last Men, and they blink.

They have left the regions where it is hard to live; for they need warmth. One still loves one’s neighbour and rubs against him; for one needs warmth.

Turning ill and being distrustful, they consider sinful: they walk warily. He is a fool who still stumbles over stones or men!

A little poison now and then: that makes for pleasant dreams. And much poison at the end for a pleasant death.

One still works, for work is a pastime. But one is careful lest the pastime should hurt one.

One no longer becomes poor or rich; both are too burdensome. Who still wants to rule? Who still wants to obey? Both are too burdensome.

No shepherd, and one herd! Everyone wants the same; everyone is the same: he who feels differently goes voluntarily into the madhouse.

“Formerly all the world was insane,” — say the subtlest of them, and they blink.

They are clever and know all that has happened: so there is no end to their derision. People still quarrel, but are soon reconciled — otherwise it upsets their stomachs.

They have their little pleasures for the day, and their little pleasures for the night, but they have a regard for health.

“We have discovered happiness,” — say the Last Men, and they blink.

– Friedrich Nietzsche, This Spoke Zarathustra [1]

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Welcome to the Global Village

David Yorkshire

Originally published at the Mjolnir Magazine Blog

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This year marks the fiftieth anniversary of the production of one of the very few television series that achieved the status of high art. I speak here of The Prisoner, largely the vision of one man: Patrick McGoohan – although his Jewish script editor George Markstein tried to take as much credit as possible for its conception. Marginalised and ignored, Markstein left before the end of the series. The series did, however, owe more to co-producer as well as director and writer of several episodes David Tomblin. There has since been a re-imagined version of the series, in 2009, which was largely thinly-veiled propaganda for the homosexual lobby, but this is not the concern of this particular article.

Firstly, a note about the quality: some of the episodes are cobbled together and superfluous to the overall narrative. This is because McGoohan had conceived of a serial of seven episodes, but ATV head (((Lew Grade))) wanted twenty-six for commercial purposes. They settled on seventeen. Particularly the episodes Do Not Forsake Me Oh My Darling, Living in Harmony and The Girl Who Was Death can be ignored.

McGoohan stated in an interview that The Prisoner came out of an “impatience with the new morology of society and the way we were being made into cyphers and so on.” The series, then, is an explicit reaction against the 1960s counterculture that has taken hold of the contemporary mainstream. It is thus more relevant now than when it was first aired in 1967.

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